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What I want to teach my daughter about her body

June 16, 2016

Photo on 6-15-16 at 3.09 PM

My daughter is only 15 months old, and already I’m thinking about what I want to teach her about her body. As a toddler Ainsley is blissfully unaware of how she looks, other than when she sees herself in the mirror and giggles in delight at her own reflection, which I love.

Already, I see how she mirrors me, copies what I do and tries to be just like mommy. Frequently I have Ainsley in the bathroom when I get ready for the day. I don’t spend a lot of time applying makeup, but she’s watching just the same. She grabs my brushes and “puts on makeup” alongside me. I remember the first time she did that I was shocked at the fact that she had been watching and observing all along.

I tell her she is beautiful every day. I see her chubby little tummy and her stunning eyes and honestly? I’ve never seen anything so beautiful in my entire life. I want her to know her worth, to love her body and to be comfortable in her own skin throughout her life.

When I think about my own journey with my body I have a lot of regrets. I think about the times I’ve been wrapped up in the number on the scale or the size of my jeans. There have been times when I’ve felt absolutely horrible about my body and times when I’ve felt near absolute peace, more so now that I’m a mom than ever before. My health journey and my relationship with food and fitness hasn’t always been what it should be, in fact at times it’s been downright tormented, but now that I’ve got a little one who looks up to me, it seems more important than ever before.

You see, I think being healthy is important, there’s no need to diminish that. Not in the pursuit of vanity, six-pack abs or looking hot in a bikini, because those things just don’t matter. The line between health and vanity is a very fine one to walk. But because I never want how I feel about my body to inhibit my parenting.

I want to throw on a swimsuit and head to the pool with no reservations, to run around the park without being winded, to take Ainsley on long walks and point out all the beauty that is in nature and explain to her that God created all that is around her. Our bodies are beautiful gifts worth caring for but not worshiping.

In this season of life I’m working on focusing on how I feel rather than how I think I look or what size jeans I wear. As I sit here writing this blog post, I feel healthy. My body feels fit, balanced, full of energy, strong. My ideal size, weight or pant size may be very different than yours, than Ainsley’s when she grows up, than another mommy at the park. My hope is that I’ll teach Ainsley to celebrate those differences by how I model that in my own life.

Madison

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4 Comments

  • Reply JB June 17, 2016 at 1:56 pm

    Yes! I came across this article this morning which is also super fitting 🙂 Not intended to be parenting advice in any way, just sharing because it’s a fascinating and relevant study: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2016/06/16/parents-should-avoid-comments-on-a-childs-weight/?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0

  • Reply Jessica June 17, 2016 at 9:06 pm

    Thank you for this. I struggle with making sure not only my little girl but also my son has a healthy, positive image of themselves no matter what especially in this day and age.

  • Reply allisonramsing June 18, 2016 at 2:30 am

    Thank you for continually speak such beautiful truth on the internet! You are an incredible mom!

  • Reply Sarah English June 21, 2016 at 3:14 pm

    This is such a great post. I love all of your enlightening pieces on your journey as a mama.

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